Present a political allegory of Philip of Spain, by giving Midas and his courtiers

Rachel Haworth


University of Hull, UK


Rachel_haw@ku.edu

 


DOI: 9889csh08765

Abstract.

During the early modern period ancient myths, like that of king Midas, began to take on a specifically modern resonance as they were used to allegorise the European quest for gold in the Americas. Lyly's play uses the myth to present a political allegory of Philip of Spain, by giving Midas and his courtiers what was considered by a contemporary English audience to be a specifically Spanish characteristic: the desire for gold. Midas asks his three counsellors, Eristus, Martius and Mellacrites, what he should ask for as his reward from Bacchus. Mellacrites, whose name suggests both sweetness and judgement, recommends the golden touch.

Keywords: England, Spainish, myth, Midas

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Psychologically important boundary between merchant-citizen and gentleman described by William Harrison

Carolina Orloff 

University of Edinburgh, UK


culturaliihistory_carolin@ku.edu

 


DOI: 9889csh09877

Abstract.

The goldsmiths had greater enticement and opportunity than many other citizens to better their social status because the nature of their wares brought them into regular contact with the world beyond the city. As craftsmen, goldsmiths had a broad clientele, from the "new consumers" (Glanville 47) who purchased single apostle spoons to the noblemen who furnished an entire table with plate. As moneylenders, goldsmiths conducted regular business with aristocrats, and gentlemen, and, increasingly, the agents of the Crown. As assayers, they made their annual progress to Star Chamber for the Trial of the Pyx and took their oaths before the Lord Treasurer or, in 1611, the King himself. The most successful goldsmiths rivalled their best customers in wealth and rank. Charles Jackson has suggested that more goldsmiths than any other kind of citizen were raised to gentle status. Socially, the retailing goldsmiths[6]were adjacent to the gentle classes and were well positioned to cross that permeable yet psychologically important boundary between merchant-citizen and gentleman described by William Harrison in hisDescription of England:

Keywords: psychology, merchant, gentleman, William Harrison 

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The ethical approach to the historical objects of Islamic art in the modern time

Jamila Hashimova 

Institute of Philosophy of ANAS, Azerbaijan


art_jamilya@mail.ru

 

Abstract. The art of Islam is beautiful in the Muslim world In Islam, art has always occupied an important place.If you read Islamic teachings, you can be sure that this religion professes an aesthetic view of life.Often Muslims repeat the phrase that God is beautiful, He loves beauty.Therefore, the art of Islam recognizes beauty as an attribute of the Divine essence.The art of the integrity of the world even without turning to the great works of art of Islam, beauty and artistry can be seen in the daily life of Muslims.Religion obliges them to have good manners.Muslims should be clean and tidy, not only in religious affairs, but also in ordinary life.These are clear indications of beauty, as her understanding of the Quran gives.

 

Keywords: Islam, art, Khalifat, Middle Ages, arab and ajam culture.

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